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Portrait and Documentary Photographer

Stephen Shore

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Stephen Shore è uno dei miei fotografi preferiti, da cui traggo ispirazione ed anche serenità quando ne guardo le fotografie :)

Stephen Shore, photo 1

Stephen Shore, photo 1

Stephen Shore, photo 2

Stephen Shore, photo 2

Stephen Shore, photo 3

Stephen Shore, photo 3

Stephen Shore, photo 4

Stephen Shore, photo 4

Stephen Shore, photo 5

Stephen Shore, photo 5

Stephen Shore, photo 6

Stephen Shore, photo 6

Stephen Shore, photo 7

Stephen Shore, photo 7

Stephen Shore, photo 8

Stephen Shore, photo 8

Stephen Shore, photo 9

Stephen Shore, photo 9

Stephen Shore, photo 10

Stephen Shore, photo 10

Stephen Shore, photo 11

Stephen Shore, photo 11

Stephen Shore, photo 12

Stephen Shore, photo 12

Stephen Shore, photo 13

Stephen Shore, photo 13

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Per chi non lo conoscesse, riporto una breve biografia presa online:

The photographic career of Stephen Shore (New York, USA, 1947) began when he was fourteen and presented his photos to the curator of photography at the MoMA in New York, Edward Steichen, who bought three of his works. At the age of seventeen Shore met Andy Warhol and started documenting the Factory and surroundings. In 1971, at the age of 24, Shore was the second living photographer to have a one-man show at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. In 1972 he started photographing the American landscape during many cross country road trips. Shore’s work has been widely published and exhibited and has influenced generations of photographers, especially because of his pioneering use of colour and vernacular imagery.

He has had solo exhibitions at the MoMA in New York; George Eastman House in Rochester, NY; Art Institute, Chicago and Kunsthalle Düsseldorf, among other venues. In 2007 his solo exhibition The Biographical Landscape was presented at the International Center of Photography in New York. In 1982 he was appointed Director of the Photography Program at Bard College in New York, where he has been the Susan Weber Soros Professor in the Arts since 1996.

His work is represented in major public collections, including the Metropolitan Museum, Whitney Museum and MoMA, New York; Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; SF MOMA, San Francisco; Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the Sprengel Museum, Hannover. Shore published various groundbreaking photobooks and some of them have been reprinted in revised editions, such as American Surfaces, Uncommon Places and The Nature of Photographs. A comprehensive monograph will be published by Phaidon in February 2008.

In 2006 Stephen Shore was the first guest editor of a biannual series called Witness, published in the US by the non-profit organisation Joy of Giving Something and Nazraeli Press. In this issue, Shore talks at length about his fascination for new technological developments such as iPhoto books and printing-on-demand, and the effect these have on his own work. Stephen Shore is represented by 303 Gallery in New York.

(source: foam.org)

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Sempre da internet:

10 Things We Can Learn from Stephen Shore

Stephen Shore became one of the most important photographers of our time by photographing everyday objects like swimming pools, street signs, shop windows or food. Sounds familiar? Read on for the 10 things we can learn from him about our own photography.

Stephen Shore is one of the most iconic American photographers of our time. Born in New York City in 1947, he started photographing at an early age and, after undertaking a roadtrip through the US at age 25, dove into color photography. His work not only proved that beauty can be created out of seemingly mundane scenes and objects, but also that color photographs can be considered as fine art, which, until the 1970s, was reserved for B&W photography only.

Shore influenced a whole generation of photographers such as Nan Goldin, Andreas Gursky, Martin Parr, Joel Sternfeld, and Thomas Struth. You can find out more about him on his website.

Here are 10 things we can learn from Stephen Shore:

1. Beauty is everywhere

More than anybody else, Stephen Shore proves that you don’t have to travel far to capture something special. It’s right here, where you are, waiting to be put into a picture.

2. Understand color

Colors are not just “there,” they are compositional elements just like lines, geometry or framing. Look out for interesting patterns and see how your photographs will change.

3. Use different formats

Don’t restrict yourself to just one format: different formats enable you distinctive ways of seeing. Shore switched formats often for various projects that he worked on, sometimes using heavy large format cameras and sometimes handheld 35mm snapshot cameras.

4. Travel

Some of Shore’s most iconic photographs came from a 1972 road trip from NYC to Texas. He just took a car and drove through the country, capturing whatever inspired him: from strangers at truck stops to women’s hats in a shop window.

5. Make yourself part of the picture

While in recent years selfies have taken on a whole new character, including parts of yourself in a picture adds a very personal touch to it. Just go beyond the odd “me in the mirror” snap and rather explore different perspectives on documenting yourself and your life.

6. Be a keen observer

Shore’s photographs wouldn’t have the same power if he didn’t observe his surroundings closely. Walk around, look and listen to understand where you are – then shoot.

7. Print your images

Looking at Stephen Shore’s images as large high quality prints is an eye-opening experience. Print out your own images in a large format and you’ll see what really works.

8. Keep a photographic diary

This may seem self-evident, but taking photos of your daily life and the things that inspire you creates a beautifully rich history of your unique life. Don’t be afraid to capture the mundane; looking at it later often reveals narratives you weren’t aware of before.

9. Believe in yourself

Stephen Shore was, and still is, highly controversial. Many don’t see anything special in his photographs. But despite the criticism, he kept on doing what he did – and eventually became one of the most important photographers of our time who inspired a whole new generation.

10. Always have your camera with you

The best photographs happen when you aren’t prepared. Make photography part of your life and you’ll always be ready.

(source: hblog.eyeem.com)

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Written by filippo

9 February 2015 at 7:19 am

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